Category Archives: First Aid

Tick Tick Tick Removal with Tick SR

As promised I am sharing about some great discoveries I found at the Global Pet Expo last month.  Tick SR stands for “Tick Safe Release” and as soon as I got to their booth and saw the product I new it was a winner! Safe fior Humans & your dog!

brochure2

 I shared the story below with the guy at the booth and said, “I wish I had this about 7 weeks ago when I had to remove a tick from our baby Yorkie!”  He explained the product with all the science behind it.  I don’t know why someone didn’t think of this before.  Tick SR comes in two forms.  A bottle of liquid (60ml or 250 ml)  that you can squirt out and convenient individually wrapped packets  or 5 or 10 with treated wipes.

60 oz Tick SR box

You can carry a wipe with you where you go.  Attach it to your poop bag holder, keep it in your pocket, or if you have one of those fancy leashes with compartments always keep one there.  The way it works is you just grab the tick with the treated wipe and hold in place till the tick releases.  Once it releases, (between 30 seconds to 4 minutes), you just drop the tick in the toilet and flush or drop it in a bottle with alcohol and keep for a week in case there is complications at the site.   You never have to or should touch the tick with your bare hands.

I find it humorous that the manufacturer’s rep as well as the website and literature emphasizes that it doesn’t harm the tick.  I really don’t care about the tick.  I’m ticked off that the tick chose my dog as a new host.  I’m not sure why they make such a big deal about not harming the tick except maybe because they explain that if you upset the tick it may regurgitate back into the dog ( horse or person) and spread disease.  They even have a large bottle for horses & Stables.

Horses

The way it works is that it dissolves the “glue” that bonds the tick to the host as well as impeding the blood flow to the area cutting off the ticks meal.  It also helps disinfect the wound to further prevent infection.  I found a video that shows how well it works.

I also found it interesting that when I read all of the scientific and testing info, that they used humans in their tests.  Apparently you can get disease free ticks from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Department of Entomology of the Oklahoma State University

Just before Christmas we discovered a tick attached above the eyelid of our Yorkie Saylor.  At first I thought it was a skin tag.  Upon further inspection I was horrified to discover a tick!  Since she only spends time outside in our regularly maintained back yard, it was the only place she could have gotten it from.  We lived here since 1998 and this is the first tick for any of our dogs.

I did all the wrong things to try to remove it.  The only other tick I ever encountered was on our German Shepherd back when I was in high school.  My dad told me to light a match, blow it out and touch it to the tick’s butt.  I did and he (or she) immediately backed out of the dogs neck.  I grabbed it in a tissue and flushed it.  Voila!  Removal complete!

Naturally that is what I tried at first with Saylor.  My husband asked if we should just get a tweezers and pull it out.  “Oh no”, I said.  I’ve read that it squeezes the stomach guts into the dog and spreads diseases.  It also upsets the tick and he may leave his head or mouth parts in the dog causing infection.  So, with Saylor (Baby) tightly held by daddy, I burned the ticks butt.  Nothing!  I did it several times and all it did was make his butt brown.  He was still alive moving his tiny legs, but made no move to escape his burning hell.  At this I said we needed plan B.  I had heard somewhere you smother it with petroleum jelly and it pulls out and leaves cause it can’t breathe.  I went to the internet to check out the method and was shocked to discover you should never cover it with soap or jelly.  Also, shocked to see you should never use a match!  The article suggested using a tweezers to pull out the tick but said it you may not get all the mouth parts out.

I felt a little foolish that I didn’t go to the internet first.  I found the tweezers and tried over and over to pull the tick but it wouldn’t budge.  IN the mean time poor little Saylor was in a death grip by my husband because it was so close to her eye.  Of course she squirmed and actually yelped a few times when I pulled the tick.  Each time she did we stopped to regroup and steady my hands and nerves.  Finally after about 45 minutes a very flattened tick was freed.  I dumped him into an empty Zephyrhills bottle and added a bit of hydrogen peroxide.  The article said to save the tick in case an infection developed in the dog.  That way you could take the tick cadaver to the vet for analysis of any diseases it may carry.

I cleaned the tiny swollen hole above her eye and applied a tiny bit of Neosporin.  Luckily, the swelling and redness disappeared within a day.  Luckily, there was no complications or infection.

Now that Spring is here, so is Tick season.  Ticks can spread diseases including the infamous Lyme Disease.   Did you know that dogs can get Lyme Disease too?   I Now have my own Tick SR in case of another tick problem.  I got the individual packets and carry them with me wherever I take the dogs.  I’m hoping that now that I am prepared I will never have this problem again…but if a tick dares to glom on to one of my pups he won’t be there for long!

Will you be prepared?  You can Get Tick SR for under $10!

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Itchy Scratchy Earth Day Solution

We recently have been staying in South Florida for business.  Upon arriving, the dogs became very itchy and uncomfortable.  We tried all kinds of things.  First, we did some topical anti-itch cream, but it didn’t seem to make a bit of difference to the dogs.  I guess placebo effect doesn’t have a chance with Yorkies.  We watched their diet, gave them extra omegas in their food, but they were still eating themselves raw.

I felt so bad for them but everything we tried was a failure.  Within about 10 days of this, their hair was gone and down to bare skin, I started looking into other things.  I did not want to take them to the vet for cortisone because I had a Lhasa once whose skin was never the same when we moved to the Florida Climate.  He was on cortisone and it worked like a charm, but he also blew up in size and the vet told us it could affect his heart.  Whenever we tried to wean him off, he lost weight but also scratched 24/7.  It was a vicious cycle.

 Since I only wanted to use drugs as a last resort, I sped up my investigation into all the new products and info I got at the Global Pet Expo.  We decided to try a sample of all natural dog shampoos and conditioners from the show.  The Organic Oscar Oatmeal Shampoo and Organic Oscar Aloe Vera Conditioner were amazing!

The pups were bathed only using a tiny bit or product because we needed to spread it to cover all 4 dogs.  As soon as they dried, the results were almost miraculous!  Not only did they smell great and feel softer and silkier then I ever remember, they were NOT itching!  Over the next few days, they rarely scratched, their hair remained very soft, and I knew we would definitely offer Organic Oscar in our store 4thrdogs.com.

Hair has all grown back, they are calm and comfortable, and were just groomed again yesterday with Organic Oscar. It is amazing how little of the product we need to use compared to the previous shampoos and conditioners.  The pump bottle also adds to ease while bathing the dog. The softness of their hair adds an extra benefit that I hadn’t counted on.  They feel so good to touch they are getting lots of extra attention from Dad and I.  We are addicted to touching their soft coat and they love it!

In honor of Earth Day, check out Organic Oscar in our American Service Paws Store…  http://www.4thedogs.com/organic-oscar-oatmeal-shampoo-for-dogs/

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What Would You Do?

What Would You Do?

When Pirate had his eye injury, I was totally unprepared for it.  Luckily, I did do the right thing.  I stayed as calm as I could, put him in his little kennel and took him straight to the vet.  I was fortunate that I was not alone and had someone there to help me not only stay calm but find the keys, and drive.

Now that the days are getting longer and the temperature is getting warmer, our pets will be enjoying the outdoors with us.  Great time for fun, playtime, and bonding but also prime season for injuries.  Are you prepared in case of an injury?  What would you do if your pet got stung by an insect or bit by a snake?  Broke a limb?  Fell in the lake or got an eye injury?

Knowing what to do in advance will help your pets’ survival and recovery.  It is important to know what to do and what NOT to do.  How do you protect them and yourself from further injury or transport them safely to the vet?  People have fire drills, hurricane preparation etc.  Now is the time to prepare in case of emergency for your pet.

Do you have the proper first aid kit for your pet?  Know how to preform CPR for your best friend?  Do you have a safe transport solution and muzzle for your protection?    Here are just some web sites that have first aid instructions for your pet:

In my next few blogs, I will cover specific emergencies and solutions to help prepare just in case.  If you have specific situations you would like me to cover, just leave a comment.  Check out http://www.4thedogs.com/med/ for fully supplied first aid kits with instruction cards.