Category Archives: Emergency

A Fall To Remember

Here is a warning story for anyone with tiny dogs. We have four…Grandma (Skipper), Grandpa (Pirate), Momma (Maui) and baby (Saylor). They all sleep with us in our king size bed that is a bit higher than a typical bed. Because of this we have a carpeted dog ramp on my side of the bed. The dogs learned to use it and come and go with ease.

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Not my dog or bedroom, but likeness of my dog ramp.

Maui is our biggest…almost eight pounds and although she uses the ramp to get on the bed, she has a habit of jumping off Dad’s side onto the hard wood floor. We tried to keep a fluffy rug there as a cushion but sometimes it gets moved and I cringe if I hear her knees hit the floor before I can grab her. Because of this I purchased two Wellness Pet Mats that I discovered at the Global Pet Expo. Since I am starting a site with solutions for older dogs and this helps with arthritis and other ailments I thought we’d get one to try it out and also cushion Maui’s daring jumps.

We got the biggest one for Dad’s side to cover a bigger area to cushion her jumps. We also got one a bit smaller for my side of the bed next to the ramp in case our little ones miss the ramp since Grandpa and Grandma are nearly blind. I never got around to placing the smaller one on my side…until today.

Late last night I came to bed later than usual because we are fostering a 3 week old kitten and I had to bottle feed him once more before bed. The room was pitch dark and as I came in the dogs awoke. Faithful tiny 4 pound Pirate (Grandpa) got up to greet me as I fumbled plugging in my phone in the dark…then I heard the terrible hard thud…He got too close to the edge near the ramp and fell on the very thin throw rug…then he made a terrible long agonizing scream. I got the light on and there he was laying on his side twitching with his little front legs stretched out in front of him.

By now my husband was waking and I grabbed up Pirate, placed him on my bed and his front legs were like straight steel rods, I couldn’t move or bend them…he was breathing heavy…I thought for sure he broke his neck or spine. I dialed the E R vet who said the vet just left (it was 12:03am). I started praying out loud for Pirate as I got the number for another ER. I called them and they said we could come right away.

We flew out the door within less than 4 minutes of the accident. I held Pirate against my chest vowing that if he was paralyzed, I’d carry him around, strap him to my chest for the rest of his life, hand feed him and do whatever it took to bring comfort to my precious little pal.

Then I started to pray…I prayed for full and complete healing in Jesus name over and over again, then I sang a little hymn into his ear as we were exiting the expressway.

My husband dropped me at the door while he parked and they were there to greet me at the door. The nurse asked me to put him down on the big scale….I told her I was worried about his spine and his legs were stiff…she reminded me they would need his weight in case of a RX Prescription. I gently placed him on the scale and he was remarkably quiet. (He is a very vocal dog usually). 4.2 Pounds…I scooped him up and we waited for the vet. By the time the vet came into the room and I put him down on the table, his tiny legs had loosened and were bendable! She took his vitals and left for a few minutes.

By the time the vet entered, Pirate was able to stand by himself on the table…he was a bit wobbly and his right front leg seemed bent in a bit. The vet wasn’t concerned and released him without any meds or treatment. By the next day he was back to his old self! We got our miracle and dodged a bullet!

 

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Sweet tiny Pirate…very fragile but big attitude and bigger heart!

In the meantime, I hurried my launch of Gramppaws.com and Gramp Paws on Facebook to bring solutions to older senior or disabled pets. I will detail my solution to keep the Yorkies safe in my next blog. Please stay tuned and be sure to visit and like our new Gramp Paws Facebook page!

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What Exactly is a SERVICE DOG?

I’m often asked what qualifies my dog to be a service dog.  The easiest way to answer that is the dog must provide a specific service to their disabled handler.  There is also a Therapy Dog or Emotional Support Dog.  Only Service Dogs qualify for full access under ADA. 

A disability can be obvious such as wheelchair bound, blind, or other physical handicap but it can also be a disability not so obvious to the general public…such as a seizure alert dog, sugar dog for diabetics, balance dog for those with Meniere’s disease, hearing alert dogs…just to name a few. 

A Therapy dog has special training and has to pass a temperament test to be calm and not startle easily around all kinds of situations.  Emotional support dogs that help people with anxiety or depression may travel on airlines only with a Doctor’s letter.

Service Dog on the other hand should be able to travel anywhere with or without documentation….although carrying  documentation or a vest & ADA Full Access cards with the Law spelled out does help avoid embarrassment by the uninformed public and business owners.

There are many types of Service Dog Identification that helps overcome public ignorance of the ADA Laws.( not required by law)

Different Types of Service Dog Identification

Look for my next blog with common questions about Service Dogs.Here is the actual ADA Law:

Service Animals

The Department of Justice published revised final regulations implementing the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) for title II (State and local government services) and title III (public accommodations and commercial facilities) on September 15, 2010, in the Federal Register. These requirements, or rules, clarify and refine issues that have arisen over the past 20 years and contain new, and updated, requirements, including the 2010 Standards for Accessible Design (2010 Standards).

Overview

This publication provides guidance on the term “service animal” and the service animal provisions in the Department’s new regulations.

  • Beginning on March 15, 2011, only dogs are recognized as service animals under titles II and III of the ADA.
  • A service animal is a dog that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for a person with a disability.
  • Generally, title II and title III entities must permit service animals to accompany people with disabilities in all areas where members of the public are allowed to go.

How “Service Animal” Is Defined

Service animals are defined as dogs that are individually trained to do work or perform tasks for people with disabilities. Examples of such work or tasks include guiding people who are blind, alerting people who are deaf, pulling a wheelchair, alerting and protecting a person who is having a seizure, reminding a person with mental illness to take prescribed medications, calming a person with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) during an anxiety attack, or performing other duties. Service animals are working animals, not pets. The work or task a dog has been trained to provide must be directly related to the person’s disability. Dogs whose sole function is to provide comfort or emotional support do not qualify as service animals under the ADA.

This definition does not affect or limit the broader definition of “assistance animal” under the Fair Housing Act or the broader definition of “service animal” under the Air Carrier Access Act.

Some State and local laws also define service animal more broadly than the ADA does. Information about such laws can be obtained from the State attorney general’s office.

Where Service Animals Are Allowed

Under the ADA, State and local governments, businesses, and nonprofit organizations that serve the public generally must allow service animals to accompany people with disabilities in all areas of the facility where the public is normally allowed to go. For example, in a hospital it would be inappropriate to exclude a service animal from areas such as patient rooms, clinics, cafeterias, or examination rooms. However, it may be appropriate to exclude a service animal from operating rooms or burn units where the animal’s presence may compromise a sterile environment.

Service Animals Must Be Under Control

Under the ADA, service animals must be harnessed, leashed, or tethered, unless these devices interfere with the service animal’s work or the individual’s disability prevents using these devices. In that case, the individual must maintain control of the animal through voice, signal, or other effective controls.

Inquiries, Exclusions, Charges, and Other Specific Rules Related to Service Animals

  • When it is not obvious what service an animal provides, only limited inquiries are allowed. Staff may ask two questions: (1) is the dog a service animal required because of a disability, and (2) what work or task has the dog been trained to perform. Staff cannot ask about the person’s disability, require medical documentation, require a special identification card or training documentation for the dog, or ask that the dog demonstrate its ability to perform the work or task.
  • Allergies and fear of dogs are not valid reasons for denying access or refusing service to people using service animals. When a person who is allergic to dog dander and a person who uses a service animal must spend time in the same room or facility, for example, in a school classroom or at a homeless shelter, they both should be accommodated by assigning them, if possible, to different locations within the room or different rooms in the facility.
  • A person with a disability cannot be asked to remove his service animal from the premises unless: (1) the dog is out of control and the handler does not take effective action to control it or (2) the dog is not housebroken. When there is a legitimate reason to ask that a service animal be removed, staff must offer the person with the disability the opportunity to obtain goods or services without the animal’s presence.
  • Establishments that sell or prepare food must allow service animals in public areas even if state or local health codes prohibit animals on the premises.
  • People with disabilities who use service animals cannot be isolated from other patrons, treated less favorably than other patrons, or charged fees that are not charged to other patrons without animals. In addition, if a business requires a deposit or fee to be paid by patrons with pets, it must waive the charge for service animals.
  • If a business such as a hotel normally charges guests for damage that they cause, a customer with a disability may also be charged for damage caused by himself or his service animal.
  • Staff are not required to provide care or food for a service animal.

Miniature Horses

In addition to the provisions about service dogs, the Department’s revised ADA regulations have a new, separate provision about miniature horses that have been individually trained to do work or perform tasks for people with disabilities. (Miniature horses generally range in height from 24 inches to 34 inches measured to the shoulders and generally weigh between 70 and 100 pounds.) Entities covered by the ADA must modify their policies to permit miniature horses where reasonable. The regulations set out four assessment factors to assist entities in determining whether miniature horses can be accommodated in their facility. The assessment factors are (1) whether the miniature horse is housebroken; (2) whether the miniature horse is under the owner’s control; (3) whether the facility can accommodate the miniature horse’s type, size, and weight; and (4) whether the miniature horse’s presence will not compromise legitimate safety requirements necessary for safe operation of the facility.

For more information about the ADA, please visit our website or call our toll-free number.

ADA Website

www.ADA.gov

To receive e-mail notifications when new ADA information is available,

visit the ADA Website’s home page and click the link near the top of the middle column.

ADA Information Line

800-514-0301 (Voice) and 800-514-0383 (TTY)

24 hours a day to order publications by mail.

M-W, F 9:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m., Th 12:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. (Eastern Time)

to speak with an ADA Specialist. All calls are confidential.

For persons with disabilities, this publication is available in alternate formats.

Duplication of this document is encouraged. July 2011

Service Dogs for Diabetics Are Lifesavers

Many people are surprised to discover that there are service dogs for diabetics. Of course, it is a well-known fact that there are thousands of service dogs assisting people throughout the country, but most people don’t realize the many ways in which these dogs can be trained to assist their ownrs.

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Service dogs that assist people with diabetes are trained to detect low blood sugar levels by scent. They are trained to determine blood sugar levels by scent.  They also help those who are not classified as diabetic but who suffer from hypoglycemia.   For example, if a dog trained in this way was to detect that its owner had dangerously low sugar levels it would alert then by paw or lick him or her. The dog’s owner could then  command to the dog to retrieve glucose tabs or other medications. If after pawing and licking the dog does not receive the appropriate command, then the dog would paw at the owner’s arm and chest or begin licking the face to make its alerts more noticeable until it receives the appropriate response or command.  The dog may even go on it’s own to retrieve a testing kit or pre arranged food or medical item.  Some dogs excel at this more than others and some are naturals who instinctively alert their handler without training.

These dogs are lifesavers, and should be treated as such, yet some difficulties can arise when service dogs are taken into public places. Problems can arise more so when the condition for which the service dog is assisting is not easily visible. Those of us that depend on our service dogs know how important they are. No one should be asked to leave their service dog outside when going into a public place. Yet this very thing may happen if people are unaware of a dog’s service animal status.

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Fortunately the ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) states that service animals are allowed in all public areas. Not everyone knows this. Because of recently revised ADA requirements for service animals, only two answers need to be given when questioned about a service animal. (1) The dog is required for assistance with a disability and (2) what task the dog has been trained to do.

Unless someone has read the ADA requirements, they will not know this; so most people find it far easier to simply use a vest or identification card to identify their dog as a service animal. These forms of service dog identification make getting around a lot easier and they go a long way in helping to avoid unnecessary confrontations with those ignorant of the law. . No one wants to explain 20 times a day how important their dog is to their health, and if others see a dog identified as a service animal, they will be less likely to prohibit the animal access.PACKAGE#7

It is important for a person with diabetes to maintain healthy blood sugar levels. It sometimes can be difficult to detect when blood sugar is becoming dangerously low or spiking too high. A dog trained to detect these things can be the difference maker.  Service dogs for diabetics are more than just companions, they are lifesavers.

Summer’s On It’s Way! Keep your Dog Safe!

Now is the time to prepare for summer fun with your best friend.  Whether you will be boating, beaching, hanging out on the dock, or by the pool, keep Fido safe with this comfortable and attractive life vest.  These vests are lightweight, comfortable and also make a fashion statement of your choice.  Several styles and colors to choose from.

Yes dogs can swim, however, they can get panicked, tired out, and even disoriented in the water.  It’s better to be safe than sorry.  We have tried several types on our dogs and find these the best.  Not only are they the safest, but also more comfortable for the dog, especially if there is a need to pluck her from the water by the handle.  Other vests only have 2 belly straps which can make uneven weight distribution causing discomfort.  These two strap models also are easier for a wriggling dog to slip out of.

The design of the Paws Aboard vests have a full hook & loop underbelly giving more support and also a feeling of security to tyour pup.  The pricing is very reasonable and affordable.

Better quality at a better price for your priceless pet!

DESIGNER DOGGIE LIFE VEST by PAWS ABOARD

Starting at $24.99

Comes in 6 sizes.  XXS, XS, S, M, L, XL

Paws Aboard Pet Life Jacket and Designer Pet Life Jackets provide  ultimate buoyancy and high visibility to keep pets safe on the water.

Constructed to provide buoyancy, along with a cozy secure fit, the Paws Aboard  Pet Life Jackets features:

An advanced breathable mesh underbelly for proper  draining and drying, which provides your dog more comfort

and healthier conditions than traditional pet life jackets, which can cause heat exhaustion  and chafing.    

  • New reflective  strips for maximum visibility,
  • Bright colors  and unique designs
  • Handle on top  for quick and easy grabbing.
  • Adjustable nylon  straps,
  • Quick-release  buckles,
  • Heavy-duty yet  more comfortable Velcro® fastening system around the belly and neck to keep  securely fastened.

Check out this direct link for more info and to purchase your lifevest.  Be sure to look around at some of our other summer fun products for your pet. Pool steps and boat ramps and ladders for easy exit from the water, Chilled water bowl, water toys, summer apparel and more!

http://www.4thedogs.com/designer-doggie-life-vests/

What Would You Do?

What Would You Do?

When Pirate had his eye injury, I was totally unprepared for it.  Luckily, I did do the right thing.  I stayed as calm as I could, put him in his little kennel and took him straight to the vet.  I was fortunate that I was not alone and had someone there to help me not only stay calm but find the keys, and drive.

Now that the days are getting longer and the temperature is getting warmer, our pets will be enjoying the outdoors with us.  Great time for fun, playtime, and bonding but also prime season for injuries.  Are you prepared in case of an injury?  What would you do if your pet got stung by an insect or bit by a snake?  Broke a limb?  Fell in the lake or got an eye injury?

Knowing what to do in advance will help your pets’ survival and recovery.  It is important to know what to do and what NOT to do.  How do you protect them and yourself from further injury or transport them safely to the vet?  People have fire drills, hurricane preparation etc.  Now is the time to prepare in case of emergency for your pet.

Do you have the proper first aid kit for your pet?  Know how to preform CPR for your best friend?  Do you have a safe transport solution and muzzle for your protection?    Here are just some web sites that have first aid instructions for your pet:

In my next few blogs, I will cover specific emergencies and solutions to help prepare just in case.  If you have specific situations you would like me to cover, just leave a comment.  Check out http://www.4thedogs.com/med/ for fully supplied first aid kits with instruction cards.